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DESSAU, GERMANY - OCTOBER 29: Frauke Petry (C), Chairwoman of the AfD (Alternative fuer Deutschland, or Alternative for Germany) political party, and AfD Saxony-Anhalt head Andre Poggenburg (R) pose for snapshots next to an AfD supporter holding a sign that reads: 'Resign, Mrs. Merkel! You can do it!' in reference to German Chancellor Angela Merkel at an AfD rally on October 29, 2015 in Dessau, Germany. The AfD, which has seen its popularity swing upward as Germany grapples with the migrants flood, is campaigning in local elections in Saxony-Anhalt scheduled for March of 2016 that will be a strong indicator of public sentiment in eastern Germany towards the migrants. The AfD, a relatively new political party that began with a right-of-center Eurosceptic platform, has seen some of its leading members use increasingly right-wing rhetoric in order to court anti-migrant votes. Petry herself strikes moderate tones and has attempted to publicly distance herself from the party's most inflammatory speaker, Bjoern Hoecke of Thuringia, who has recently used neo-Nazi jargon and themes in his speeches. (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)

DESSAU, GERMANY - OCTOBER 29:  Frauke Petry (C), Chairwoman of the AfD (Alternative fuer Deutschland, or Alternative for Germany) political party, and AfD Saxony-Anhalt head Andre Poggenburg (R) pose for snapshots next to an AfD supporter holding a sign that reads: 'Resign, Mrs. Merkel! You can do it!' in reference to German Chancellor Angela Merkel at an AfD rally on October 29, 2015 in Dessau, Germany. The AfD, which has seen its popularity swing upward as Germany grapples with the migrants flood, is campaigning in local elections in Saxony-Anhalt scheduled for March of 2016 that will be a strong indicator of public sentiment in eastern Germany towards the migrants. The AfD, a relatively new political party that began with a right-of-center Eurosceptic platform, has seen some of its leading members use increasingly right-wing rhetoric in order to court anti-migrant votes. Petry herself strikes moderate tones and has attempted to publicly distance herself from the party's most inflammatory speaker, Bjoern Hoecke of Thuringia, who has recently used neo-Nazi jargon and themes in his speeches.  (Photo by Sean Gallup/Getty Images)