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OKAYAMA, JAPAN - SEPTEMBER 21: A potential user, using his own muscles to open and close the pinch mechanism on this 3D printed prosthetic arm, checks the practicality by attempting to grasp a pen on September 21, 2015 in Okayama, Japan. The prosthetic arm 'Finch' that can be mass-produced by 3D printers has been developed by Daiya Industry Co., Ltd. in collaboration with the teams of Professor Shunji Yamanaka of the University of Tokyo, Associate Professor Masahiro Yoshikawa of Nara Institute of Science and Technology, and Dr. Noritaka Kawashima of National Rehabilitation Center for Persons with Disabilities. The Finch also features an adjustable socket as opposed to the socket custom-made by molding, which enables the cost to be much less than the traditional prosthesis. Finch will debut as a product on October 7, 2015 at the International Home Care and Rehabilitation Exhibition, and be available for order at around 100,000 yen (approx. 826 USD). (Photo by Trevor Williams/Getty Images)

OKAYAMA, JAPAN - SEPTEMBER 21:  A potential user, using his own muscles to open and close the pinch mechanism on this 3D printed prosthetic arm, checks the practicality by attempting to grasp a pen on September 21, 2015 in Okayama, Japan. The prosthetic arm 'Finch' that can be mass-produced by 3D printers has been developed by Daiya Industry Co., Ltd. in collaboration with the teams of Professor Shunji Yamanaka of the University of Tokyo, Associate Professor Masahiro Yoshikawa of Nara Institute of Science and Technology, and Dr. Noritaka Kawashima of National Rehabilitation Center for Persons with Disabilities. The Finch  also features an adjustable socket as opposed to the socket custom-made by molding, which enables the cost to be much less than the traditional prosthesis. Finch will debut as a product on October 7, 2015 at the International Home Care and Rehabilitation Exhibition, and be available for order at around 100,000 yen (approx. 826 USD).  (Photo by Trevor Williams/Getty Images)