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TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY ALBERT KAMBALE A member of the Lucha association, campaingning for tap water, walks on June 16, 2014 with an empty water container on his head, with the slogan 'Goma wants water,' in the northeastern city of Goma, where most of the one million residents of the city are still waiting to have clean, uncontaminated running tap water in their homes. Goma lies on the edge of one of the largest soft water reservoirs in the world, lake Kivu, where it is rains abundantly, but most people have to go to the lake to fetch water, chlorinate it for drinking or buy it some from sellers, who make about 10 US dollars a day, transporting an average of 120 liters (30 gallons) on bicycles from the lake to the city. Goma, which borders Rwanda, has seen its population explode with refugees from Rwanda, nearby Burundi and internally-displaced Congolese, fleeing the numerous conflicts in the region. AFP PHOTO / JUNIOR D.KANNAH (Photo credit should read JUNIOR D.KANNAH/AFP/Getty Images)

TO GO WITH AFP STORY BY ALBERT KAMBALE
A member of the Lucha association, campaingning for tap water, walks on June 16, 2014 with an empty water container on his head, with the slogan 'Goma wants water,' in the northeastern city of Goma, where most of the one million residents of the city are still waiting to have clean, uncontaminated running tap water in their homes. Goma lies on the edge of one of the largest soft water reservoirs in the world, lake Kivu, where it is rains abundantly, but most people have to go to the lake to fetch water, chlorinate it for drinking or buy it some from sellers, who make about 10 US dollars a day, transporting an average of 120 liters (30 gallons) on bicycles from the lake to the city. Goma, which  borders Rwanda, has seen its population explode with refugees from Rwanda, nearby Burundi and internally-displaced Congolese, fleeing the numerous conflicts in the region.      AFP PHOTO / JUNIOR D.KANNAH
        (Photo credit should read JUNIOR D.KANNAH/AFP/Getty Images)