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South African President Jacob Zuma reacts as he delivers the speech for 2017's State Of the Nation Address(SONA), on February 9, 2017, at the Parliament in Cape Town. A violent brawl broke out in South Africa's parliament on February 9, 2017 as guards exchanged punches with opposition lawmakers who had shouted down President Jacob Zuma as he tried to deliver his state of the nation address. In chaotic scenes, about 30 guards dressed in white shirts forcibly ejected about 25 members from the radical leftist Economic Freedom Fighters (EFF) party who had prevented the president from speaking for about an hour. / AFP / POOL / SUMAYA HISHAM (Photo credit should read SUMAYA HISHAM/AFP/Getty Images)

South African President Jacob Zuma reacts as he delivers the speech for 2017's State Of the Nation Address(SONA), on February 9, 2017, at the Parliament in Cape Town.
A violent brawl broke out in South Africa's parliament on February 9, 2017 as guards exchanged punches with opposition lawmakers who had shouted down President Jacob Zuma as he tried to deliver his state of the nation address. In chaotic scenes, about 30 guards dressed in white shirts forcibly ejected about 25 members from the radical leftist Economic Freedom Fighters (EFF) party who had prevented the president from speaking for about an hour. / AFP / POOL / SUMAYA HISHAM        (Photo credit should read SUMAYA HISHAM/AFP/Getty Images)

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South Africa's main opposition party Democratic Alliance (DA) leader Mmusi Maimane (C) reacts after leaving following the South African president speech for the 2017's State Of the Nation Address (SONA) at the Parliament in Cape Town on February 9, 2017. A violent brawl broke out in South Africa's parliament on February 9, 2017 as guards exchanged punches with opposition lawmakers who had shouted down President Jacob Zuma as he tried to deliver his state of the nation address. In chaotic scenes, about 30 guards dressed in white shirts forcibly ejected about 25 members from the radical leftist Economic Freedom Fighters (EFF) party who had prevented the president from speaking for about an hour. / AFP / POOL / Nic BOTHMA (Photo credit should read NIC BOTHMA/AFP/Getty Images)

South Africa's main opposition party Democratic Alliance (DA) leader Mmusi Maimane (C) reacts after leaving following the South African president speech for the 2017's State Of the Nation Address (SONA) at the Parliament in Cape Town on February 9, 2017. 
A violent brawl broke out in South Africa's parliament on February 9, 2017 as guards exchanged punches with opposition lawmakers who had shouted down President Jacob Zuma as he tried to deliver his state of the nation address. In chaotic scenes, about 30 guards dressed in white shirts forcibly ejected about 25 members from the radical leftist Economic Freedom Fighters (EFF) party who had prevented the president from speaking for about an hour. / AFP / POOL / Nic BOTHMA        (Photo credit should read NIC BOTHMA/AFP/Getty Images)

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South African President Jacob Zuma (C) takes the national salute during the opening ceremony of the State Of The Nation Address (SONA) at the parliament in Cape Town, on February 9, 2017. South African President Jacob Zuma prepared to deliver his annual state of the nation address on February 9, 2017 after deploying more than 440 soldiers to prevent a repeat of violent clashes outside parliament. Zuma, 74, has faced growing criticism since his last address over a series of damaging corruption scandals, worsening unemployment levels and slowing economic growth. / AFP / POOL / Nic BOTHMA (Photo credit should read NIC BOTHMA/AFP/Getty Images)

South African President Jacob Zuma (C) takes the national salute during the opening ceremony of the State Of The Nation Address (SONA) at the parliament in Cape Town, on February 9, 2017.
South African President Jacob Zuma prepared to deliver his annual state of the nation address on February 9, 2017 after deploying more than 440 soldiers to prevent a repeat of violent clashes outside parliament. Zuma, 74, has faced growing criticism since his last address over a series of damaging corruption scandals, worsening unemployment levels and slowing economic growth.
 / AFP / POOL / Nic BOTHMA        (Photo credit should read NIC BOTHMA/AFP/Getty Images)

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A member of parliament, center, shouts out against the Economic Freedom Fighters political party, disruption of South African President Jacob Zuma's state of the nation address in Cape Town, South Africa, on February 11, 2016. South Africa's radical leftist Economic Freedom Fighters (EFF) party walked out of President Jacob Zuma's state of the nation address after repeatedly interrupting his speech in chaotic parliamentary scenes. / AFP / AP / Schalk van Zuydam (Photo credit should read SCHALK VAN ZUYDAM/AFP/Getty Images)

A member of parliament, center, shouts out against the Economic Freedom Fighters political party, disruption of South African President Jacob Zuma's state of the nation address in Cape Town, South Africa, on February 11, 2016.  
South Africa's radical leftist Economic Freedom Fighters (EFF) party walked out of President Jacob Zuma's state of the nation address after repeatedly interrupting his speech in chaotic parliamentary scenes. / AFP / AP / Schalk van Zuydam        (Photo credit should read SCHALK VAN ZUYDAM/AFP/Getty Images)

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Blade Nzimande, South Africa's higher education minister, pauses during a news conference ahead of the mid-term budget speech in Cape Town, South Africa, on Wednesday, Oct. 26, 2016. While South Africa's Finance Minister Pravin Gordhan forecast in February that the economy would grow 0.9 percent this year, soft commodity prices, a lackluster global economy and a crippling drought have put that target beyond reach. Photographer: Waldo Swiegers/Bloomberg via Getty Images

Blade Nzimande, South Africa's higher education minister, pauses during a news conference ahead of the mid-term budget speech in Cape Town, South Africa, on Wednesday, Oct. 26, 2016. While South Africa's Finance Minister Pravin Gordhan forecast in February that the economy would grow 0.9 percent this year, soft commodity prices, a lackluster global economy and a crippling drought have put that target beyond reach. Photographer: Waldo Swiegers/Bloomberg via Getty Images