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In this photograph taken on November 7, 2016, the sun appears through heavy smog in the Connaught Place area of New Delhi on November 7, 2016. Schools in the Indian capital will be closed for the next three days, the Delhi state goverment said on November 6, as the city struggles with one of the worst spells of air pollution in recent years / AFP / DOMINIQUE FAGET (Photo credit should read DOMINIQUE FAGET/AFP/Getty Images)

In this photograph taken on November 7, 2016, the sun appears through heavy smog in the Connaught Place area of New Delhi on November 7, 2016.
Schools in the Indian capital will be closed for the next three days, the Delhi state goverment said on November 6, as the city struggles with one of the worst spells of air pollution in recent years / AFP / DOMINIQUE FAGET        (Photo credit should read DOMINIQUE FAGET/AFP/Getty Images)

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To go with Climate-warming-UN-COP21-India,FOCUS by Trudy Harris In this November 15, 2015 photo, Indian joggers exercise on a smoggy morning near the India Gate monument in New Delhi. India's capital, with 18 million residents, has the world's most polluted air with six times the amount of small particulate matter (pm2.5) than what is considered safe, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). The air's hazardous amount of pm2.5 can reach deep into the lungs and enter the blood, causing serious long term health effect, with the WHO warning India has the world's highest death rate from chronic respiratory diseases. India, home to 13 of the world's top 20 polluted cities, is also the third largest emitter of greenhouse gases behind the United States and China. In Delhi, the air pollution is due to vehicle traffic including cargo trucks running on low-grade diesel, individual fires that residents burn in winter, crop being burnt by farmers in neighboring states, and construction site dust. Burning coal in power plants is also major contributor that is expected to increase hugely in the coming decades to match electricity needs of the ever-growing city and its booming satellite towns. (Photo credit should read ROBERTO SCHMIDT/AFP/Getty Images)

To go with Climate-warming-UN-COP21-India,FOCUS by Trudy Harris
In this November 15, 2015 photo, Indian joggers exercise on a smoggy morning near the India Gate monument in New Delhi. India's capital, with 18 million residents, has the world's most polluted air with six times the amount of small particulate matter (pm2.5) than what is considered safe, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). The air's hazardous amount of pm2.5 can reach deep into the lungs and enter the blood, causing serious long term health effect, with the WHO warning India has the world's highest death rate from chronic respiratory diseases. India, home to 13 of the world's top 20 polluted cities, is also the third largest emitter of greenhouse gases behind the United States and China. In Delhi, the air pollution is due to vehicle traffic including cargo trucks running on low-grade diesel, individual fires that residents burn in winter, crop being burnt by farmers in neighboring states, and construction site dust. Burning coal in power plants is also major contributor that is expected to increase hugely in the coming decades to match electricity needs of the ever-growing city and its booming satellite towns.        (Photo credit should read ROBERTO SCHMIDT/AFP/Getty Images)

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To go with Climate-warming-UN-COP21-India,FOCUS by Trudy Harris In this November 3, 2015 photo, Rigzen (R) wears a mask as he heads to his morning class at a college past a long line of vehicles moving slowly during rush hour in a smoggy morning in New Delhi. India's capital, with 18 million residents, has the world's most polluted air with six times the amount of small particulate matter (pm2.5) than what is considered safe, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). The air's hazardous amount of pm2.5 can reach deep into the lungs and enter the blood, causing serious long term health effect, with the WHO warning India has the world's highest death rate from chronic respiratory diseases. India, home to 13 of the world's top 20 polluted cities, is also the third largest emitter of greenhouse gases behind the United States and China. In Delhi, the air pollution is due to vehicle traffic including cargo trucks running on low-grade diesel, individual fires that residents burn in winter, crop being burnt by farmers in neighboring states, and construction site dust. Burning coal in power plants is also major contributor that is expected to increase hugely in the coming decades to match electricity needs of the ever-growing city and its booming satellite towns. AFP PHOTO / ROBERTO SCHMIDT (Photo credit should read ROBERTO SCHMIDT/AFP/Getty Images)

To go with Climate-warming-UN-COP21-India,FOCUS by Trudy Harris 
In this November 3, 2015 photo, Rigzen (R) wears a mask as he heads to his morning class at a college past a long line of vehicles moving slowly during rush hour in a smoggy morning in New Delhi. India's capital, with 18 million residents, has the world's most polluted air with six times the amount of small particulate matter (pm2.5) than what is considered safe, according to the World Health Organization (WHO). The air's hazardous amount of pm2.5 can reach deep into the lungs and enter the blood, causing serious long term health effect, with the WHO warning India has the world's highest death rate from chronic respiratory diseases. India, home to 13 of the world's top 20 polluted cities, is also the third largest emitter of greenhouse gases behind the United States and China. In Delhi, the air pollution is due to vehicle traffic including cargo trucks running on low-grade diesel, individual fires that residents burn in winter, crop being burnt by farmers in neighboring states, and construction site dust. Burning coal in power plants is also major contributor that is expected to increase hugely in the coming decades to match electricity needs of the ever-growing city and its booming satellite towns. AFP PHOTO / ROBERTO SCHMIDT        (Photo credit should read ROBERTO SCHMIDT/AFP/Getty Images)

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This photo taken on December 23, 2015 shows pupils from an elementary school covering their mouths and noses as they leave the schoolyard after the classes were suspended because of a 'red alert' for heavy smog in Binzhou, east China's Shandong province. Ten Chinese cities were on red alert for smog on December 24, state media reported, as large swathes of the country suffered through their fourth wave of choking pollution this month. CHINA OUT AFP PHOTO / AFP / STR (Photo credit should read STR/AFP/Getty Images)

This photo taken on December 23, 2015 shows pupils from an elementary school covering their mouths and noses as they leave the schoolyard after the classes were suspended because of a 'red alert' for heavy smog in Binzhou, east China's Shandong province. Ten Chinese cities were on red alert for smog on December 24, state media reported, as large swathes of the country suffered through their fourth wave of choking pollution this month.   CHINA OUT     AFP PHOTO / AFP / STR        (Photo credit should read STR/AFP/Getty Images)

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Indian commuters journey along a major road as heavy smog covers New Delhi on November 7, 2016. Schools in the Indian capital will be closed for the next three days, the Delhi state goverment said on November 6, as the city struggles with one of the worst spells of air pollution in recent years / AFP / DOMINIQUE FAGET (Photo credit should read DOMINIQUE FAGET/AFP/Getty Images)

Indian commuters journey along a major road as heavy smog covers New Delhi on November 7, 2016.
Schools in the Indian capital will be closed for the next three days, the Delhi state goverment said on November 6, as the city struggles with one of the worst spells of air pollution in recent years / AFP / DOMINIQUE FAGET        (Photo credit should read DOMINIQUE FAGET/AFP/Getty Images)