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MEXICO CITY, MEXICO - APRIL 5: A family of Gray Whales swim in the waters off the coast of Los Cabos, Mexico City, Mexico. (Photo by Marcos Delgado/Clasos.com/LatinContent/Getty Images)

MEXICO CITY, MEXICO - APRIL 5: A family of Gray Whales swim in the waters off the coast of Los Cabos, Mexico City, Mexico. (Photo by Marcos Delgado/Clasos.com/LatinContent/Getty Images)

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Gray whale swims close to journalist on a eco-tourist boat, at the Ojo de Libre Lagoon in Guerrero Negro, Mexico, on 5 March 2009. Ojo de Liebre lagoon is one of three primary breeding lagoons that the whales seek in the Baja California peninsula. AFP PHOTO/Luis Acosta (Photo credit should read LUIS ACOSTA/AFP/Getty Images)

Gray whale swims close to journalist on a eco-tourist boat, at the Ojo de Libre Lagoon in Guerrero Negro, Mexico, on 5 March 2009. Ojo de Liebre lagoon is one of three primary breeding lagoons that the whales seek in the Baja California peninsula. AFP PHOTO/Luis Acosta (Photo credit should read LUIS ACOSTA/AFP/Getty Images)

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A gray whale's flukes are seen at the San Ignacio Lagoon, Baja California Sur state, Mexico on February 28, 2010. Although a debate is now raging among some whaling nations to begin limited hunting again, the Pacific gray whales have been protected since 1947, and are at the center of a growing whale-sightseeing industry. Their numbers have dropped by a third, from around 26,000, in the late 1990s. Scientists say that the decline was caused by melting artic ice impacting on their food chains, which include small fish, crustaceans, squid and other tiny organisms. A small-scale whale-sightseeing industry was developed in the remote spot of San Ignacio Lagoon, off Mexico's northwest Baja California peninsula, where grey whales breed and nurse their calves each year after migrating thousands of miles from Canada and Alaska. AFP PHOTO/OMAR TORRES -- MORE PICTURES IN IMAGE FORUM (Photo credit should read OMAR TORRES/AFP/Getty Images)

A gray whale's flukes are seen at the San Ignacio Lagoon, Baja California Sur state, Mexico on February 28, 2010. Although a debate is now raging among some whaling nations to begin limited hunting again, the Pacific gray whales have been protected since 1947, and are at the center of a growing whale-sightseeing industry. Their numbers have dropped by a third, from around 26,000, in the late 1990s. Scientists say that the decline was caused by melting artic ice impacting on their food chains, which include small fish, crustaceans, squid and other tiny organisms. A small-scale whale-sightseeing industry was developed in the remote spot of San Ignacio Lagoon, off Mexico's northwest Baja California peninsula, where grey whales breed and nurse their calves each year after migrating thousands of miles from Canada and Alaska. AFP PHOTO/OMAR TORRES    --  MORE PICTURES IN IMAGE FORUM (Photo credit should read OMAR TORRES/AFP/Getty Images)

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The tail of a gray whale surfaces out of the water, at the Ojo de Libre Lagoon in Guerrero Negro, Mexico, on 5 March 2009. Ojo de Liebre lagoon is one of three primary breeding lagoons that the whales seek in the Baja California peninsula. AFP PHOTO/Luis Acosta (Photo credit should read LUIS ACOSTA/AFP/Getty Images)

The tail of a gray whale surfaces out of the water, at the Ojo de Libre Lagoon in Guerrero Negro, Mexico, on 5 March 2009. Ojo de Liebre lagoon is one of three primary breeding lagoons that the whales seek in the Baja California peninsula. AFP PHOTO/Luis Acosta (Photo credit should read LUIS ACOSTA/AFP/Getty Images)

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A Humpback whale swims in the surface of the Pacific Ocean at the Uramba Bahia Malaga natural park in Colombia, on July 16, 2013. Humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) migrate annually from the Antarctic Peninsula to peek into the Colombian Pacific Ocean coast, with an approximate distance of 8,500 km, to give birth and nurse their young. Humpback whales have a life cycle of 50 years or so and is about 18 meters. AFP PHOTO/Luis ROBAYO (Photo credit should read LUIS ROBAYO/AFP/Getty Images)

A Humpback whale swims in the surface of the Pacific Ocean at the Uramba Bahia Malaga natural park in Colombia, on July 16, 2013. Humpback whales (Megaptera novaeangliae) migrate annually from the Antarctic Peninsula to peek into the Colombian Pacific Ocean coast, with an approximate distance of 8,500 km, to give birth and nurse their young. Humpback whales have a life cycle of 50 years or so and is about 18 meters.  AFP PHOTO/Luis ROBAYO        (Photo credit should read LUIS ROBAYO/AFP/Getty Images)