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This picture taken on January 31, 2018 shows (from left) unit 1 to unit 4 reactor buildings and storage tanks for contaminated water at the Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Okuma, Fukushima prefecture. The Fukushima nuclear power operator is hoping to use the 2020 Tokyo Olympics as a springboard to double the number of visitors to its Tsunami-ravaged plant, as it seeks to clean up the region's image. A massive undersea earthquake on March 11, 2011 sent a tsunami barrelling into Japan's northeast coast, leaving more than 18,000 people dead or missing and sparking the Fukushima crisis, the worst such accident since Chernobyl in 1986. / AFP PHOTO / Behrouz MEHRI / TO GO WITH AFP STORY 'JAPAN-NUCLEAR-FUKUSHIMA-DISASTER' BY SHINGO ITO (Photo credit should read BEHROUZ MEHRI/AFP/Getty Images)

This picture taken on January 31, 2018 shows (from left) unit 1 to unit 4 reactor buildings and storage tanks for contaminated water at the Tokyo Electric Power Company (TEPCO) Fukushima Dai-ichi nuclear power plant in Okuma, Fukushima prefecture.
The Fukushima nuclear power operator is hoping to use the 2020 Tokyo Olympics as a springboard to double the number of visitors to its Tsunami-ravaged plant, as it seeks to clean up the region's image. A massive undersea earthquake on March 11, 2011 sent a tsunami barrelling into Japan's northeast coast, leaving more than 18,000 people dead or missing and sparking the Fukushima crisis, the worst such accident since Chernobyl in 1986.
 / AFP PHOTO / Behrouz MEHRI / TO GO WITH AFP STORY 'JAPAN-NUCLEAR-FUKUSHIMA-DISASTER' BY SHINGO ITO        (Photo credit should read BEHROUZ MEHRI/AFP/Getty Images)