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MOLA (Museum of London Archaeology) archaeologist Luisa Duarte poses for a picture holding a Roman waxed writing tablet containing the earliest written reference to London, dated AD 65/70-80, which translated reads 'Londinio Mogontio' (in London, to Mogontius...), at Bloomberg's offices in central London on June 1, 2016, during a presentation of artefacts found beneath Bloomberg's new European headquarters. A trove of Roman writing tablets has been unearthed in the heart of London, archaeologists announced on June 1, shedding light on the commerce-driven life in what became the City of London financial hub. The wooden tablets contain the earliest surviving written reference to London and the earliest dated handwritten document from Britain from January 8, 57 -- less than 14 years after the Roman invasion. / AFP / DANIEL LEAL-OLIVAS (Photo credit should read DANIEL LEAL-OLIVAS/AFP/Getty Images)

MOLA (Museum of London Archaeology) archaeologist Luisa Duarte poses for a picture holding a Roman waxed writing tablet containing the earliest written reference to London, dated AD 65/70-80, which translated reads 'Londinio Mogontio' (in London, to Mogontius...), at  Bloomberg's offices in central London on June 1, 2016, during a presentation of artefacts found beneath Bloomberg's new European headquarters. 
A trove of Roman writing tablets has been unearthed in the heart of London, archaeologists announced on June 1, shedding light on the commerce-driven life in what became the City of London financial hub. The wooden tablets contain the earliest surviving written reference to London and the earliest dated handwritten document from Britain from January 8, 57 -- less than 14 years after the Roman invasion. / AFP / DANIEL LEAL-OLIVAS        (Photo credit should read DANIEL LEAL-OLIVAS/AFP/Getty Images)