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A screen displays a diagram showing the ripples in the fabric of space-time called gravitational waves that scientists have observed for the first time by the LIGO detector, confirming a prediction of Albert Einstein's theory of relativity, during a press conference at the National Press Club in Washington, DC, February 11, 2016. The machines that gave scientists their first-ever glimpse at gravitational waves are the most advanced detectors ever built for sensing tiny vibrations in the universe.The two US-based underground detectors are known as the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory, or LIGO for short. / AFP / SAUL LOEB (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)

A screen displays a diagram showing the ripples in the fabric of space-time called gravitational waves that scientists have observed for the first time by the LIGO detector, confirming a prediction of Albert Einstein's theory of relativity, during a press conference at the National Press Club in Washington, DC, February 11, 2016.
The machines that gave scientists their first-ever glimpse at gravitational waves are the most advanced detectors ever built for sensing tiny vibrations in the universe.The two US-based underground detectors are known as the Laser Interferometer Gravitational-wave Observatory, or LIGO for short.
 / AFP / SAUL LOEB        (Photo credit should read SAUL LOEB/AFP/Getty Images)