THULA, YEMEN - MARCH 6:  Yemeni children are seen playing soccer on March 6, 2011 in Thula, Yemen.  The Haraz Mountains are rising abruptly off the steamy Red Sea coastal and for centuries have acted as a cultural fortress protecting the Yemeni heartland from interfering foreigners. Today the suspicion of outsiders is largely a thing of the past, but what hasn't changed one jot is the grandeur of the mountains and the beauty of their tapestry of terraced fields and fortified villages, all huddled together on the most unlikely crags. The Haraz Mountains remain one of the best location for treeking. Yemen is one of a number of countries in the North African and Middle East region that have seen increasing unrest since the presidents of Egypt and Tunisia were ousted in popular revolts earlier this year. The protest against President Ali Abdullah Saleh's 32-year rule have left about 30 people dead since the beginning of the year 2011. Hundreds of police moved in, using tear gas, water cannons and live bullets in Tahrir Square, where protesters have been camping out for weeks. The protesters, fed up with corruption, poverty and a lack of political freedom, have rejected Mr Saleh's offers to form a national unity government and demanded that he step down. The president also faces a separatist movement in the south, a branch of al-Qaeda, and a periodic conflict with Shia tribes in the north. The poplutaion of Yemen is about 24.3m and it has a median age of 17.9 and a literacy rate of 61%, youth unemployment is 15% and the gross national income per head is USD 1,060 according to the World Bank report from 2009.  (Photo by Marco Di Lauro/Getty Images)